Easy Way to Learn Key Signatures

by Marilyn Plant
(Cypress, TX 77429)

Knowing the key signatures to the flats is easy - always the second last flat; but how do you figure out the key signatures when working with sharps? There has to be a way to figure that out by looking/studying it a second or two (other than just "knowing" it).

ANSWER

Hi Marilyn--

Your are absolutely right! There IS an easy way to determine the key signature in a sharp key.

The name of the key is the note that is 1/2 step up fom the last sharp. For example, if the key signature is F# C# and G#, go 1/2 step up from G# to determine that the key is "A" Major.

Thanks for your question! If you need more information about key signature, go to:

Key Signature--Sharp Keys

or

Key Signature--Flat Keys

Best Wishes!
Lynne

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Jun 02, 2009
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CONFUSED!
by: Anonymous

I tries your theory for working out the key signature when working with flats and failed. First of all do you mean half or one slash two when you say 1/2. If it is half then i just cant see how that works.

ANSWER

I am sorry but I do not understand your question. Please visit Key Signatures--Flat Keys.

Lynne

Oct 27, 2008
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help me with key signatures
by: Anonymous

i completely don't understand key signatures. How do they work and how do you use them?

thank you

ANSWER

Key signatures are just a way of notating which notes in a particular scale (key) are sharp or flat.
Every major scale except "C" major has at least ONE sharp or flat.

The sharps or flats are used to preserve the relationship between the notes in a major scale. The pattern of whole and half steps is W W H W W W H.

We use key signatures to determine the chords which belong to a particular scale and to know what scale to use with a specific chord progression.

If you have not checked out Music Key Signatures, you might want to do so. There you will find a complete explanation and examples.

Lynne

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